Coparenting on Halloween

Parents hold a girl hands, family time

Celebrating together, splitting up trick-or-treating time, and alternating years or holidays are some ways that parents can peacefully share child custody on Halloween. The day’s activities allow parents and children to share a fun bonding experience. Child custody lawyers often recommend that parents address the holiday in their parenting schedule.

Read More

Your Guide to Surrogacy in Nevada

A pregnant woman sitting in a sofa with her dog

The surrogacy laws in Nevada are detailed and precise, making it easy for people to become parents through gestational surrogacy.

Read More

Determining Custody When Your Child Has Special Needs

Little girl and father enjoying book together, laying on floor, parenting time

A family law case involving a child with special needs focuses primarily on his or her proven needs and achieving what is in the child's best interests. Special considerations have to be made when considering what is in the best interests of the child.

Read More

Considering a Child’s Developmental Needs When Determining Parenting Time

A boy is playing a car

Considering the developmental needs of the children is vital when determining parenting time. When parents separate or divorce, parenting time schedules are intended to provide a suitable solution to meet the child's health care, nutritional, educational, social, and emotional needs. A child custody attorney, mediator, or counselor can help parents determine the best parenting time solutions to ensure they are appropriate for their child's developmental level.

Read More

Nevada Is One of the Most Progressive LGBTQ Parenting States in the Nation

Two man holding a kid each, LGBTQ parenting

Nevada has a new law that allows more than two people to hold parenting rights through adoption. According to proponents, Assembly Bill 115 recognizes the transformation of family structure as social diversity takes center stage and assisted reproductive technology becomes common.

Read More

Don’t Let Your Custody Battle Turn You Into a Helicopter Parent

Mom with her son looking at camera

Custody disputes can bring out the worst parenting behaviors. Helicopter-parenting deprives the child(ren) of coping abilities, leading children to live more apprehensive, entitled, and ineffective lives. There are many manifestations of helicopter parenting. Awareness helps children of divorce have healthier development and relationships with their parents.

Read More

How Is Custody Determined in Nevada

Daughter drawing with her father together

Child custody agreements in Nevada address legal custody, physical custody, and visitation schedules. Typically, joint custody is favored when possible, unless it is not determined to be in the best interests of the child. When separated parents are on amicable terms, parenting agreements are generally constructed by the parents with assistance from a mediator when necessary. If there is a dispute that cannot be resolved outside of court, a Nevada judge will make a custody decision in the best interest of the child.

Read More

Marital Agreements

Marital Agreements Prenup

Surratt Law Practice, PC is a Reno, Nevada firm that can represent you in drafting and/or negotiating a prenuptial or postnuptial marital agreement.  Prenuptial agreements are a tool to address property and asset division before a relationship goes “sours” when the two people still care about each other.

In the state of Nevada, engaged, married, or cohabiting couples may enter into agreements defining their property rights, and depending upon the type of agreement, their support, and other rights and obligations according to Chapter 123A.010 – 100 of the Nevada Revised Statutes.

The Uniform Premarital Agreement Act defines a premarital agreement as, “an agreement between prospective spouses made in contemplation of marriage and to be effective upon marriage.” Talking about establishing a prenuptial agreement as part of your wedding plans may seem like a negative conversation. The emotional dynamic of “negotiating the divorce while planning the wedding” can be difficult.

Read More

Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act: A Triumph for LGBTQ Rights in 2020

By Travis Clark, Esq.

On June 15, 2020, the United States Supreme Court issued its opinion in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia, 590 U.S. (2020) – click here for full opinion of the court.  The case involved three separate cases of discrimination against the LGBTQ community:

  • Gerald Bostock was fired from his job for conduct “unbecoming” of a county employee, shortly after he joined a gay softball league. Bostock worked in Clayton County as a child welfare advocate.  Under his leadership, the county won national awards for its work.  After a decade with the county, he was fired shortly after joining the gay softball league.
  • Altitude Express, a skydiving company, fired Donald Zarda days after he mentioned being gay to a client who he thought would feel more at ease due to the tandem skydive, in which their bodies would be very close and touching.
  • Aimee Stephens was fired from Harris Funeral Homes when she transitioned from male to female, after being employed with the funeral home for six years.

Read More

Top 5 Tips for Appearing in a Nevada Court via Internet Device

Zoom washoe county court case

By: Melissa L. Exline, Esq.

In Nevada, many Courts are continuing operations using “audio/visual” equipment.  In Washoe County, this has included programs such as Zoom.  The Judge, Court Clerk, along with a court reporter are present to run the Court.  This has been a learning process for all involved.  Having participated in Court this way for the past month, here is a top 5 tip list for a person appearing in family court in Washoe County:

  1. Dress as if you are going to Court. You still want to look like a nice, respectable person.  First impressions cannot be re-made – so start out on the right foot.
  2. Practice with your equipment at home and feel free to ask if your lawyer has done this too. You do not want to be figuring this out with the pressure of court looming.
  3. Let your attorney be your guide. He or she still knows the players involved better than you do, and Court etiquette still applies.  It can be hard to figure out when to speak up, so it is good to have a plan with your lawyer on how you want to be heard if everyone is talking.
  4. Have a plan on how to talk to your lawyer. Either use the chat features on the application (practice this in advance), or have a plan to email/text/be on the phone with your lawyer while all the other stuff is going on so you can make a private point with your lawyer (when this is permissible) with your attorney.
  5. Manage your expectations on what you can get out of court. This applies for video court or not – but the point is important.  There is only so much time and your lawyer will know which points to make and in what order.  Not everything gets done the way you want it to be, but getting some things done in a tumultuous time is going to have to suffice for now.

Read More

Next Page »
Nothing on this website should be construed as creating an attorney client relationship. Unless and until you sign a written retainer with our office, we will not act as a lawyer on your behalf. There is no guarantee that any information provided by a visitor to this website will be kept confidential. None of the information provided on this website is intended as legal advice to any specific person. All cases are different and even through this website does in some instances provide useful information about legal concept and principles, nothing stated here is intended to provide legal advice to any visitor to this website. No information provided here will prevent us from representing a client whose interests are adverse to yours. We invite you to contact us, and we welcome your calls, letters and emails. Contacting us does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not send any confidential information to us until such time as an attorney-client relationship has been established.